investment planning

Does Buy and Hold Still Work?

As an investment strategy, "Buy and Hold" is just what it sounds like: you buy an investment and hold it for an extended period, riding out market fluctuations and selling when the price reaches your target. The underlying logic of this strategy is that investments tend to gain value over time. That long-term gain, along with compound interest, can work to increase your initial deposit and provide you with a valuable asset for your future.

Is Inflation Missing?

Many commentators are expecting increased inflation in the coming months as Central Banks globally have ramped up their money creation efforts in response to the increased market volatility last March. There are different types of inflation, but most people have experienced price inflation, whereby excess demand is met by rising prices. The next round of anticipated inflation could be different than what most people are familiar with.

A State of Financial Wellness

Money has long been the number one stressor for many Canadians, and there's no doubt that COVID has magnified this reality. It has upended jobs, security, health and financial stability for people across the country. Millions of Canadians are struggling to cover their bills. In March of 2020, 49% of Canadians were just $200 from financial insolvency1.

Moving For a New Job? Consider the Costs

A job change is no longer just about higher pay or a better title. It can also be about achieving a healthier life balance or simply trying something new. In many cases, a new job includes relocating to a new community. A new opportunity can be very exciting, but even the most positive change comes with financial implications, especially when a move is involved. It’s good to understand the unexpected costs around relocating. A little knowledge can help you capitalize on the momentum of your new role without compromising your overall financial plan.

When Volatility Arrives, Optimism is Key!

The focus here is on you as an investor! What do you bring to the table in terms of investment experience and personal temperament (emotions) that impacts your investment returns and satisfaction while building your nest egg?

Put Your Eggs In Many Baskets

When their investment savings plummeted in the 2001 stock market crash, Adam and Sonya were concerned, but not panicked. Retirement was a long way out, so they had plenty of time to recover. The couple decided to try their hand at 'timing the market' (buying and selling stocks based on expected market fluctuations) to recover their losses. "We thought that if we stayed on top things and could chart when the market would go up and down, we could make our money back," says Adam.

How Now Horatio Alger?

Horatio Alger1 was an American writer of novels about impoverished boys rising from humble backgrounds to middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination, courage and honesty. His writings were characterized by the "rags-to-riches" narrative, which continues to have a formative effect on many entrepreneurs today.

History is a Good Teacher

Like many young adults, Lindsay took what her parents had to say with a grain of salt when it came to money. A new college graduate with an entry-level job, she was more interested in spending her paycheques than saving them. Saving was for later, she thought. Life was for living. When her father raised an eyebrow or offered advice, she brushed him off.

Then came the financial collapse of 2008. Lindsay lost her job and moved back into her parents' basement, regretting immediately almost every dollar she had blown.

Volatile Economy = Investor Fatigue

Investors are becoming increasingly exhausted trying to follow the seemingly never-ending bad global economic news. Overseas markets have put a strain on Canada even though we are more stable, economically, than most other countries in the world.

Crystal balls are in short supply resulting in increased skepticism and general feeling of Is this downturn ever going to end?' The uncertainty has investors reeling - leading them to make judgements with their portfolios that they wouldn't normally exercise.

Baby Boomers Getting Nervous

What Comes Next?

With Canada and many other countries practicing physical distancing or participating in complete lockdowns because of the COVID-19 virus, thoughts are turning to what the world may look like after the restrictions have been lifted.

Many people are expressing a desire for life to return to how it was before the arrival of this public health emergency. However, it is likely that some aspects of our lives will have been irrevocably changed because of COVID-19.

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